• MeetDr. Cheong

    Voted by Peers as aTampa Top Doctors
    • Board Certified/Fellowship Trained
    • Member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
    • Specializes in Disorders of the Hips, Knees, & Shoulders
    • 2013 and 2014 “Attending of the Year” University of South Florida Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
    • The only orthopedic surgeon in West Florida offering Direct Anterior Approach Total Hip Arthroplasty using the MAKO robotic system.
  • Regain movement & strengthComplex Joint Reconstruction

  • Diagnosis and Treatment of Malignant & Benign disorders of the musculoskeletal system Orthopedic Oncology

  • Restore function with the most intricate procedure Limb Preservation Surgery

Falls & Hip Fractures

The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur or thigh bone and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint.

Hip fracture is a break that occurs near the hip in the upper part of the femur or thigh bone. The thigh bone has two bony processes on the upper part – the greater and lesser trochanters. The lesser trochanter projects from the base of the femoral neck on the back of the thigh bone. Hip fractures can occur either due to a break in the femoral neck, in the area between the greater and lesser trochanter or below the lesser trochanter.

Hip fracture is most frequently caused after minor trauma in elderly patients with weak bones, and by a high-energy trauma or serious injuries in young people. Long term use of certain medicines, such as bisphosphonates to treat osteoporosis (a disease causing weak bones) and other bone diseases, increases the risk of hip fractures.

Signs and symptoms of hip fracture include

  • Pain in the groin or outer upper thigh
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • Discomfort while rotating the hip
  • Shortening of the injured leg
  • Outward or inward turning of the foot and knee of the injured leg

Your doctor may order an X-ray to diagnose your hip fracture. Other imaging tests, such as the magnetic resonance imaging or (MRI), may also be performed to detect the fracture.

Depending on the area of the upper femur involved, hip fractures are classified as

  • Intracapsular Fracture
  • Intertrochanteric Fracture
  • Subtrochanteric Fracture

Hip fractures can be corrected and aligned with non-operative and operative methods:

Traction may be an option to treat your condition if you are not fit for surgery. Skeletal traction may be applied under local anesthesia, where screws, pins and wires inserted into the femur and a pulley system is set up at the end of the bed to bear heavy weights. These heavy weights help in correcting the misaligned bones until the injury heals.

Hip fractures can be surgically treated with external fixation, intramedullary fixation, or by using plates and screws.

Patient Testimonails - David Cheong MD - Orthopaedic Surgeon

Patient Testimonials

Patient Testimonails - David Cheong MD - Orthopaedic Surgeon Dr. Cheong is one of the best doctors we have ever had, and a real credit to OAWF and Mease Countryside Hospital. His skill and personality are impeccable and when we asked the nurses how they enjoyed working with Dr. Cheong, they couldn’t say enough about his skill and treatment of the patients and nursing staff.